The Little Prince

About a month ago I wrote a book recommendation for The Little Prince. Last night, I watched Netflix’s film adaptation of this story with my wife, and all I can say is that it was fantastic. First, I was unaware of how many big-name celebrities were cast. The only one I knew before watching was Jeff Bridges, but there is also Rachel McAdams, Paul Rudd, Marion Cotillard, Benicio Del Toro, Ricky Gervais, Paul Giamatti, James Franco, and Albert Brooks. Second, this adaptation did not just turn the book into film. It created a story around the book while leaving the original story unblemished. The book and even the drawings are included. This movie uses the original story as a central them within a new story, and this new story works as a modern translator that I believe amplifies the importance of the original (or at least relates it to modern audiences). After all, the book was first published over 70 years ago when technology was just the first sprinkles of rain that would become the ocean it is today.

For those who read my original book recommendation, I stated I first discovered the book from watching the trailer for this specific film adaptation. I was intrigued by the story, so I went and read the book first. Then I eventually got around to watching the movie. I love them both equally. The movie follows the original text and uses the narrator as an actual character. Then, to my surprise, the movie goes beyond the end of the original story. Continuing it in a way that is both unexpected and touching. The film, overall, does exactly what the book does and maybe even better. It makes us remember things we used to know as a child. It makes us remember a very important part of life that we adults tend to forget while worrying about the many responsibilities we have.

Though the film is an animated feature that kids would enjoy. I think the story is really meant for adults. After all, there are no age restrictions when it comes to stories. Recommended maturity levels? Maybe. Some stories should be reserved until a child gets older, but you can never be too old to enjoy a story meant for younger generations. If you’ve never experienced this story, I highly recommend it in either medium.

I hope you find a few moments today (and every day) to stop and appreciate the world we live in. To forget the many demands on your time and breathe. Take in the world around you. There is so many places to find joy.

Book Recommendation – Good Omens

Today I am recommending Good Omens by Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett. The story (subtitled The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch) follows approximately three main characters: the angel Aziraphale, the demon Crowley, and the Anti-Christ aptly named Adam. Crowley has been tasked with ensuring the Anti-Christ is raised to accomplish what he was born to do. However, Crowley has grown quite fond of Earth and humans and decidedly isn’t 100% behind Armageddon. Neither is Aziraphale, who has also grown quite fond of Earth and humans as well. Crowley and Aziraphale have both been on Earth since its beginning and long ago came to an agreement not to prevent the other from doing their jobs. An agreement that would make them something close to friends. The result is a delightfully humorous book about the end of the world.

This book is technically the first book of fiction I’ve read by Terry Pratchett (I’ve read many of Neil Gaiman’s books). I have yet to read any of his Discworld books and have only read one collection of non-fiction that came out shortly after he passed away, but I’ve always known Terry as a fantasy-comedy writer and he does not disappoint in this collaboration.

I was recently lucky enough to see Neil Gaiman in person where he read an excerpt of this book and talked about how it was written and the agreements he made with Terry regarding the adaptation of the book into film. You can tell that Neil misses him terribly as any good friend would miss another good friend. The book came out in 1990 and has been adapted into a television series scheduled to premiere later this year, so I’m sure you will be seeing more about it in the future.

The characters of Crowley and Aziraphale were incredibly fun and, though fundamentally at opposition, they make the business of influencing humans toward good and evil extremely entertaining. They have fun and you can’t help but have fun too. Yes, there is some absurd moments, but you must have a little absurdity to have a comical Armageddon. After all, they are discussing the ineffable.

Though I am not a religious man, I am curious about the “powers that be” in the bible and the supernatural elements of the stories it contains. If you like to laugh and aren’t put off by two English guys telling a witty, rapturous story that borders on blasphemy, then you will absolutely enjoy this book. I know I did.

Happy Reading.

 

Last Book Recommendation of the Week

This week’s book recommendation is The Time Machine by H.G. Wells. I thought it fitting to make this the last recommendation of the year (and last of the weekly recommendations). The book is in itself a time machine as most books are. It was originally published in 1895, but holds up well in 2018. Of course, the language is a little dated but not so much to cause difficulty in reading. It may even increase your vocabulary as several words in it aren’t commonly used anymore.

It is still an entertaining book. Enough so that it has been made into movies as recently as 2002. I’m sure in 1895 this book would have been considered outlandish, entertaining, and even frightening, but today I’m afraid it would seem just another story. There is an enormous amount of science fiction today that includes time travel. However, this story is the first mention of the concept (I would be more than happy if someone proved me wrong here). It is always interesting to go back and read books like this that seem to be an integral building block to one of today’s most popular fictional subjects. As a writer, it is also interesting to read what had inspired other writers throughout the years. You begin to notice similarities the more you read whether they may be intentional or not.

Time travel has always been of interest to me because it is very hard to pull off in terms of making it believable or at least practical. There is always a chance missing a small incongruity that ends up debunking the whole concept. These are often in the form of paradoxes but sometimes can just be continuity errors. Either way, they bring in doubt which greatly weakens the story.

H.G. Wells was very clever when he wrote this story because he made it simple with no complicated processes that could easily have initiated such an error. He introduces the machine itself without diving into the technical aspects about how it works (a technique often used by Christopher Nolan in many of his films). He does so in a way that makes it simply believable. We don’t need to get to the nitty-gritty. We just want to see what happens next. Wells then has the traveler go so far into the future that no one could ever refute what happens in the story. Too many time-travel stories make the mistake of setting the future to within one or two generations which quickly dates them, such as Back to the Future. In this book, the character travels hundreds of thousands of years. The world we see through the time traveler (since that is all we know him by) is one that is, for all we know, plausible.

Through clever writing and an engaging narrative despite several dated terms and a standard Victorian structure, The Time Machine holds up for modern audiences. It is shorter at around 120 pages and broken up into 12 chapters, which allows you to break up the reading if you don’t want to read it all in one go.

Happy Reading.

Book Recommendation of the Week

This week’s book recommendation is Art Matters by Neil Gaiman & Chris Riddell. This book is less a traditional book and more of a small collection of essays that are both a defense of art and its importance to humanity and a call to action to not give up on your dreams. There are four sections of this little book and each page is filled with Neil’s words accompanied with brilliant illustrations by Chris Riddell. This book is one I already consider essential to anyone who aspires to create anything. It’s short enough to be enjoyed in one, brief sitting.

I was fortunate enough to see Neil in person last month (the day before this little book officially released), and he read a section from it called “Why Our Future Depends on Libraries, Reading, and Daydreaming.” This section was also from his book A View from the Cheap Seats, but before that it was originally given as the second annual lecture of the Reading Agency in 2013. This section goes on to detail the importance of (you guessed it) libraries, reading, and daydreaming. The importance of aspiring to create thing that did not exist before. To put forth into the world something it has never seen. It details how libraries are havens for more than just books. It informs us…..well….I shouldn’t give it all away and spoil it for you.

This tiny little book, so small it could easily be overlooked, has not become one of the most important books in my personal library. It is important because it is a reminder. It is something I can easily pick up when my self-doubt tries to overwhelm me into giving up on my aspirations of being a writer myself. It washes away that doubt and replaces it with inspiration to get back to it and write. I simply flip through the pages and my brain is rinsed of negativity and the imagination glands begin to pump out ideas. Of course this makes this book even more valuable to writers and artists, but it is important for everyone. Each of the four sections have been previously printed or recorded, but they are all collected here in a convenient, pocket-sized book, for you to enjoy when you most need it.

I know it is the holiday season and Christmas is only a few days away. If you need a last-minute gift idea for the creative person (or anyone who likes books), here it is. If you don’t get this book as a gift this year, go out and treat yourself.

Happy Reading.

Book Recommendation of the Week

This week’s book recommendation is The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis. My now father-in-law bought this book for me over a year ago and I just got around to reading it last month (that to-be-read pile never decreases). Of course, Clive Staples (C.S.) Lewis is best known for writing the Chronicles of Narnia series. I haven’t read that series, and now that I think about it, this might be the first of Lewis’s books that I have read.

This book reads as a collection of letters sent by Screwtape, a demon/devil, to his nephew, Wormwood. The letters offer advice on how to effectively tempt a human in such a way that they end up in Hell as sustenance for fellow demons. Though I am not a religious man, I enjoyed this book for several reasons.

The first being the historical context and reassurance that humanity has suffered the same or similar societal issues for at least the past 100 years. This book was published in 1942. Many of the tricks that Screwtape offers his nephew to persuade his patient are also reflections on human nature and its social interactions. I was surprised to find many of the behaviors spot on even for today, nearly eighty years after they were written, in a time drastically different due to technological advancement and the connection of humanity across the world by the ambivalent internet.

I know that C.S. Lewis had a crisis of faith at one time and that J.R.R. Tolkien, along with another friend, helped him during this time. The result ended up with Lewis bolstering his beliefs and going on to write many theologically influenced books, including this one. Lewis even dedicated this book to J.R.R. Tolkien. Lewis and Tolkien were best friends as they taught at Oxford and remained friends their entire lives. They often reviewed each other’s works and offered advice. I could go further into their relationship, but I’ll refrain because I’ll end up talking more about Tolkien than Lewis, or this book of his that I’m recommending.

The letters often refer to a war and how it could be used to win the battle for the human soul. This war refers to World War II, but I wouldn’t be surprised if World War I had some influence as well. Apparently there are many ways for us humans to be influenced toward sin and other actions. There is also many ways we can seemingly be redeemed (and fairly easily). This book is considered “Christian apologetic novel” and honestly I’m not entirely sure what that means, but it has many interesting lectures I think anyone can enjoy. Lewis stated that he had a hard time writing this book because Screwtape was such an abhorrent character (being a demon). Luckily for us, he was able to produce this interesting religious and social commentary.

Happy Reading.