Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Rules for Writing

I am happy to finally talk about a piece of artwork I had commissioned by the incredible artist Jillian Kaye. This piece is Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Rules for Writing (as seen below). If you would like a copy of this awesome print, you can purchase it at JillianKayeArt.com. Also, since you are reading this post and hopefully enjoy my stories or discussions about books and writing, you can use the code “GRANFALLOON” to get free shipping!

I posted about Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules for Writing a few weeks ago, and I’ll admit I also wanted to have Vonnegut’s rules on my wall above my desk. There are no “real” rules to writing (I’ve posted two sets now) and you can likely find many more “rules” by Vonnegut himself online. These are more like reminders or advice to keep in mind while writing. I pulled the 8 Rules for the Vonnegut artwork from the book Pity the Reader which shares much more about Vonnegut and his views on writing and life. That book in turn had pulled the “rules” from a newspaper article Vonnegut had written about titled “How to Write with Style.”

So, this goes to show that writing is truly an individual art and there is no real way of doing it wrong. Enjoy yourself and keep going. Use these rules for guidance, or perhaps Neil’s rules work better for you, or perhaps use no rules at all. Or create your own rules. Whatever works for you is what you should use.

Vonnegut-finalpiece-hires

On Kurt Vonnegut

Kurt VonnegutI gained a greater appreciation of Kurt Vonnegut after reading Pity the Reader by Suzanne Collins and Kurt Vonnegut. I had read a handful of his books prior and did so primarily because he had become a larger literary figure and his book Slaughterhouse Five is often considered a classic American novel. I failed to fully appreciate the few novels I’d read at the time, and all of his work I’ve read recently I’ve enjoyed immensely. I think it is because I have a better understanding of the work as it continues to relate to the world we live in today.

Granted, some of the stories are dated considering they were written 60-80 years ago, but they are dated much in the same fashion as Philip K. Dick’s work is dated. In a nostalgic way that showed how hopeful and imaginative some were about a future that has since come and passed. Unfortunately, several topics Vonnegut covered continue to remain problematic in today’s society despite the decades since he wrote about them.

I first discovered Vonnegut randomly and without realizing who he was. There is/was this website that would take you to random websites much like playing roulette with the entire internet. I don’t recall the name, but several people at the university I was attending were using it to alleviate boredom and I momentarily joined the trend. Anyway, as I was jumping around the web, I came across a YouTube video of an older guy discussing the shapes of stories. This guy turned out to be Vonnegut and that video supposedly became fairly popular as Suzanne Collins explains in Pity the Reader. This was my first encounter with Vonnegut and surprisingly remains with me. He was witty and fun while remaining serious about what stories were and how they impact us, or rather what is needed for us to like or relate to them. He was able to distill complex topics into simple explanations which is the mark of a master.

Though I have explored Vonnegut’s work, there is still plenty I have yet to cover but I am taking my time. I don’t feel a rush to read it all and I think it is better to read his books scattered among other books (at least that is how I like to read them). After learning more about Kurt Vonnegut, I not only feel I have a better appreciation of his work, I think I have a better appreciation of what this life is and what we should be doing with it. I hate to say I need reminders from time to time as I get busy with work and responsibilities and forget to take a step back and remember to breathe. Vonnegut’s work often does the job reminding me that society is essentially a farce and we shouldn’t invest too heavily in our participation.

Vonnegut, like many other authors I’ve come to cherish, was actually alive during my lifetime but I failed to realize this until after his passing. Kurt Vonnegut was born in 1922 and died in 2007. He first published in 1951 and went on to write 14 novels, three short story collections, five plays, and five nonfiction works. Much of his work, and much about himself, had a deep-rooted connection to his time spent as a soldier in World War II. Many speculate that Slaughterhouse Five is his work that most closely discusses his experience during the bombing of Dresden. Perhaps his view of the world was highly influenced by his need to make some sort of sense out what he experienced, but that is simply my own speculation. Regardless of what happened in the past, he left behind a sizable volume of work that continues to be read by many today and which will persist well into the future.

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules for Writing

A long time ago, I shared Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules for Writing and included an art print that I purchased from NeverWear with art by David Mack. You can purchase this print as well while it is still available. I have this print hanging above my desk as a reminder that writing is really much simpler than we make it out to be, but it is also a reminder that it can be difficult and we need to persevere and finish what we start in order to have a completed story or piece of work.

Writing is also subjective, as I have another set of rules I will be sharing later, which is a reminder that the only rules you need to follow are the ones that work for you. There is no “correct” way to write (with perhaps an exception being rule #1 below).

So, for all my fellow writers, new and old, full of confidence or self-doubt, I leave you these reminders below and encourage you to persevere and finish your work, at your own pace, because you never know who may be waiting to read it.

Neil Gaiman 8 Rules

Welcome To The Monkey House

Welcome to the Monkey House book coverWelcome To The Monkey House is a collection of short stories by Kurt Vonnegut. Having recently read Pity the Reader which provided much insight into Vonnegut the writer and Vonnegut the person, I read this collection with much more appreciation, and much more fun, that I think I would have otherwise. I even laughed out loud a few times which I almost never do when reading.

I will also admit that I partially picked up this collection for the story “Harrison Bergeron” which I had read in either high school or my undergraduate years (so many years ago) and had for a long time associated the story with Ray Bradbury (I think because I read the story at first while also reading Fahrenheit 451).

This collection is great. Despite all of these stories being written in the 1950s and 1960s, most of them comment on social issues that persist or are, unfortunately, re-emerging today. I also think it is fun to read stories like these 60-70 years after they were written because they often imagine a future that people from those days thought might come to pass. They were big dreamers back then and lived in a much different world than the one we have today. Of course, these being stories, they include conflict despite the “bright” future they imagine or because of the “darker” future they could also dream up. I will admit that “Deer in the Works” may not be terribly far off from a situation Vonnegut imagined could happen in a future of mega-corporations.

Overall, this is a fun collection and, despite some aspects of these stories being outdated, the stories remain relevant and insightful about the human race and the way we interact with each other.

Happy Reading.

The Sandman

Sandman and the Endless

Sandman and the Endless by Jim Lee & Jeremy Roberts

I have to admit that The Sandman was an interesting journey to say the least. I haven’t read many comics (despite knowing many comic characters and stories [no, not just Marvel ones]), but it is a unique medium that is worth looking into if you have been hesitant to do so. Of course, there are tons of stories within the medium and you simply need to find one you are interested in. I decided to begin Sandman for various reasons: I’ve heard friends talk about it, I’ve seen it show up several times in circles of interest, and one of my favorite authors, Neil Gaiman, wrote it. Granted, a comic is a product of much collaboration and creation and each contributor deserves their due. Some contributors changed throughout the series, but here are those who created the first issue titled “Sleep of the Just”: Neil Gaiman (writer), Sam Kieth & Mike Dringenberg (artists), Todd Klein (letters), Daniel Vozzo (colors), Art Young (assistant editor), and Karen Berger (editor).

I acquired the Omnibus Editions Continue reading